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TOPIC: Remember Pearl

Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308012

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Just before 8 a.m. on December 7, 1941, hundreds of Japanese fighter planes attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor near Honolulu, Hawaii. The barrage lasted just two hours, but it was devastating: The Japanese managed to destroy nearly 20 American naval vessels, including eight enormous battleships, and more than 300 airplanes. More than 2,000 Americans soldiers and sailors died in the attack, and another 1,000 were wounded. The day after the assault, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to declare war on Japan; Congress approved his declaration with just one dissenting vote. Three days later, Japanese allies Germany and Italy also declared war on the United States, and again Congress reciprocated. More than two years into the conflict, America had finally joined World War II.
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Last edit: by Acegirl.

Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308021

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Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308030

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Famous photo of female Pearl Harbor firefighters


History corrects itself, when this famous picture found its way to the only surviving woman and gives the accounts of how her life was impacted after the Japanese attack and recalls the real day that the picture might have been taken.


A photograph of three women reportedly fighting fires in the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor has been debunked. Katherine Lowe, 96, who is the woman standing second from the right in the picture, says that while the photo is real, it wasn't actually taken on December 7, 1941.

On the morning of Dec. 7, "We were ready to go to church," Lowe told msnbc.com. "We didn't know we were at war. We went to church anyway. We were looking at all the planes bombing."

After the country joined the war, she applied for a civilian job at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard in a storage facility. ‘We were rugged,’ Lowe said. ‘We carried heavy stuff, oil drums, bags, anything that needed to be stored.’ Fires in the storage areas were devastating and common so ‘they trained us for firefighting’.
She remembered putting out one real fire, but she mostly just enjoyed the practise: ‘It was a lot of fun. We'd shoot water at one another.’

Lowe says she and her co-workers at the Dole pineapple factory did go to work as civilians at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, which did include fighting fires. However, she said the photograph that has received so much attention was likely taken during a training exercise later during the war.

The photograph has had quite the run through the history books. Originally taken by a freelance photographer and now archived at Getty Images, the caption reads, "Women firefighters direct a hose after the Japanese attack on the US naval base at Pearl Harbor."

She went on to work as a clerk in a Navy office at Pearl Harbor, moved to Okinawa with her second husband to work for the U.S. Army, and then moved back to Pearl Harbor before retiring.

She stayed friends with Elizabeth Moku after the war. Moku retired as a Navy commissary cashier and died in 1986 aged 64 or 65.
Lowe said she does not know what happened to the other women in the photo, Alice Cho and Hilda Van Gieson. Death records suggest they have too passed away.

By LYDIA WARREN

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2073158...e.html#ixzz3thF4jpja
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Last edit: by Acegirl.

Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308032

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Thank you for posting this, Acegirl. I've been on the memorial above the USS Arizona, and it's quite the experience, knowing what happened at that very spot almost 75 years ago.

And about that photo, very interesting! It's crazy how something like that can go through history books as a misinterpretation. Makes you wonder...

On a similar topic, in concerning women and the US military; this past weekend it was announced that all branches of the armed forces are preparing to fully implement women into all specialties of the military, including and specific to infantry and special forces. I'd say that's one for the books.
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Last edit: by [NLR] Luna.

Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308034

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After that day no one wrlere to turn on the light in there homes
SOTFL









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Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308035

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After that day no one were able to turn on the light in there homes at night so that if more bombers fly past they wouldn't bomb
SOTFL









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Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308046

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Believed to be the first bomb dropped on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in the sneak-attack on Dec. 7, 1941, this picture was found torn to pieces at Yokusuka Base by photographer's mate 2/C Martin J. Shemanski of Plymouth, Pennsylvania. One Japanese plane is shown pulling out of a dive near bomb eruption (center) and another the air at upper right. (AP Photo)
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Last edit: by Acegirl.

Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308047

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Good post Ace but think the girls were on a Photo shoot while they were on a drill long after the actual attack. Think they used women around after the attacks sort of as if you want to call them dock workers? Know that's not proper name but they were also trained to fight fires. Not 100% sure on what I am writing here but pretty sure that's a staged photo. Also just looks to good and if I had a camera Id be filming the attack or fires instead, so no negative posts. I am not knocking women in the war effort if that's what your thinking. Always like your posts though, just had to add to this one.

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Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308050

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You are right Artho, the picture was taken days after the attack, and looks like it was publish as propaganda, and for many years it was believe to be taken the day of the attack. In 2011 they track down one of the women on the picture now in her 90’s; Katherine Lowe explain to reporter that the picture was done a different day and that this was the first time she had seen it.
Lowe said she had no memory of anyone taking a photograph, but she can tell from the two photos that they're not at a fire, probably a training exercise at the Pearl Harbor shipyard.
This is the second photo:
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Last edit: by Acegirl.

Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308058

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A small boat rescues a USS West Virginia crew member from the water after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941 during World War II. Two men can be seen on the superstructure, upper center. The mast of the USS Tennessee is beyond the burning West Virginia. (AP Photo)
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Last edit: by Acegirl.

Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308102

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Some videos from the DOD (Department of Defense).







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Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308105

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"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve." - Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

He understood that sneaking, then camping and spawnkilling was a bad idea in the long run. :whistle:
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Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308152

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[NLR] McFate wrote: "I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve." - Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

He understood that sneaking, then camping and spawnkilling was a bad idea in the long run. :whistle:


Actually the Japanese sneak attack was quite brilliant in both planning and execution. The problem was that they didn't take advantage of their initial success and invade Hawaii so they would have a base to strike at the continental USA.. therefore they soon lost their advantage from that initial strike and also didn't take into account our ability to quickly start producing war machinery and as well as training the citizens that quickly stepped up to join the military services.
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Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308173

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ZebraUp wrote:

[NLR] McFate wrote: "I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve." - Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

He understood that sneaking, then camping and spawnkilling was a bad idea in the long run. :whistle:


Actually the Japanese sneak attack was quite brilliant in both planning and execution. The problem was that they didn't take advantage of their initial success and invade Hawaii so they would have a base to strike at the continental USA.. therefore they soon lost their advantage from that initial strike and also didn't take into account our ability to quickly start producing war machinery and as well as training the citizens that quickly stepped up to join the military services.


As a U.S. Navy veteran, and a student of warfare it's always been my opinion that a Japanese invasion on Hawaii, would have been successful, but the outcome of the war would've ultimately been the same.

However, an invasion of the United States mainland would've been a disaster. The success of any invading army depends on its ability to manage the civilian population. The Japanese certainly would've been able to conquer us militarily, at least partially in late 1941 or early 1942, but did not, as best I can see, because of the resolve and fortitude of our civilian population.

First to consider, is our right to keep and bear arms. It's said that if the Japanese had invaded that they would have reached Texas or the Midwest before we could stop them. Again militarily, that's probably true. However, around every street corner, every road, and every field that would've been US civilians waiting with firearms and plenty of ammo.

Second to consider is public relations. Every island, and country that the Japanese invaded was inhabited by a weak and/or poor rural population that was just downright scared shitless of the Japanese Imperial Army. They were frightened in no small part due to if state control radio broadcasts, broadcast out of Japan, and the propaganda they carried. China, the Philippines, and other Pacific island nations had little to no independent media. Thanks to The infrastructure put in place by the new deal, President Roosevelt's fireside chats, and a pretty good literacy rate for the time we just weren't buying what the Japanese were selling.

The Japanese could have never, and could never conquer a nations such as the US. They lacked the population, and the industrial might. The only thing they did have going for them was thier shear will, and commitment to total victory. While hindsight is always 2020, had they made some different choices, they could've prolonged the inevitable and made it a lot more difficult on us. The Japanese were pretty much doomed from the start, after their attack on Pearl. I think on some level, they knew this, especially in a ground war on our turf, and that's why there was never any serious thought or planning put into doing so.


However, how did Germans not re nigged, on The deal they had with the Russians, they may have had a chance. I read somewhere that they tried to negotiate with Mexico and alliance by which Mexico would regain control of Texas New Mexico Arizona and California, after a successful invasion of the United States by combined forces of the third Reich and Mexico.
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Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308180

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Thanks for that write up Ghostrider! Very interesting.

Do you have any thoughts about how it may have changed the war if the US carriers Lexington and Enterprise had been in Pearl Harbor when the Japanese attacked?




As for the Japanese attacking the US mainland, it actually happened! ...Well, sort of... The Japanese submarine "I-17" made a nuisance of itself by lobbing 16 shells at an oil refinery near Santa Barbra, California. Another sub "I-25" shelled a civil war era fort on the Columbia river in Oregon. It actually did more damage to an adjacent baseball field. The nerve! Attacking the place of a traditional American pastime! Lol. It then went to the south coast of Oregon and sent a seaplane with incendiary bombs in an attempt to start wild fires.

Similar to the intent of the US' Doolittle raiders, the I-25 attacks were for the most part pretty toothless but they did manage to set the USA and it's citizens on edge. The unease and rumors of a concerted attack resulted in "The Battle of Los Angeles", where anti-aircraft guns fired at "ghosts" for an entire night.

Here is a link from the History Channel 5 Attacks on U.S. Soil During World War II
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Last edit: by [NLR] McFate. Reason: To correct info

Remember Pearl 4 years 2 months ago #308233

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The Japanese strike on Pearl harbour was triggered by an oil embargo that the the US instilled upon Japan to try to suffocate their economy . Stemming from a battle over control of the Pacific region and the rich recources that lay there .
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Remember Pearl 1 year 2 months ago #375043

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Remember Pearl 2 months 2 weeks ago #379037

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Remember Pearl
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President Franklin D. Roosevelt call it a "date which will live in infamy": 2,403 sailors, soldiers and civilians were killed and about 1,000 people were wounded in what is considered one of the saddest events of American history.
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